What is workplace retaliation?

Our New York Employment Lawyers are often contacted by employees who believe that they are being illegally retaliated against. Workplace retaliation is unlawful. If you feel you have been retaliated against for making complaints in the workplace, you should know if you are protected under the law.  Our experienced employment lawyers can help yo to determine if you are being retaliated against. Think about these questions to see if you might be a victim of unlawful retaliation:

  1. Have you recently objected to any activity, policy, or practice of the employer which is in violation of a law, rule, or regulation?
  2. Have you recently refused to participate in any activity, policy, or practice of the employer which is in violation of a law, rule, or regulation?
  3. Have you recently disclosed, or threatened to disclose, to any appropriate governmental agency an activity, policy, or practice of the employer that is in violation of a law, rule, or regulation?
  4. Have you recently provided information to, or testified before, any appropriate governmental agency, person, or entity conducting an investigation, hearing, or inquiry into an alleged violation of a law, rule, or regulation by the employer?

Here are some examples of other types of complaints where the law protects you from retaliation.

Discrimination: If you are the victim of discrimination or harassment based upon your race, age, sex, religion, national origin, color, disability, genetic information, disability, sexual orientation, or your association with a person in one of these categories, then you have to follow your employer’s published discrimination/harassment policy and report it.

Wage/overtime violations: If you’re terminated for objecting to failure to pay wages owed or failure to pay overtime, you may be protected from retaliation under the Fair Labor Standards Act or your state’s wage/hour laws.

What to do:

  1. Put it in writing even if the employer’s policy says to have a meeting. You can present the written document at the meeting.  That way you have proof that you complained about something that’s protected.
  2. If you complain, keep it professional and to the point. Stick to the facts.
  3. Your employer is entitled to investigate your complaint. That means even if they have a policy of keeping your complaint confidential, your boss, the person you’re complaining about, and your witnesses and other coworkers will probably find out about it. Be prepared for that to happen, and be ready to report retaliation.
  4. If you are retaliated against for reporting something illegal, put your complaint of retaliation in writing. If the retaliation doesn’t stop, or if you get fired, disciplined, demoted, or a pay cut as a result, contact an employment attorney.

If you have any questions, or think you are being unlawfully retaliated against, contact us.  Our New York Employment Lawyers can help.