ny overtime pay

Am I Entitled to Overtime if I am on Salary?

Maybe.

Just because your employer pays you a salary does not necessarily mean you are ineligible for overtime.  In other words, you may be entitled to receive overtime even if your employer tells you that you are not.

Whether or not an employee is entitled to overtime depends on the following factors:

  • First, you must make at least $455 per week. 
  • Next, you must be treated like a salaried employee – you cannot get docked for working less in a given week.  You must get paid the same every week, no matter what.
  • Finally, there is the nature of the work you do.  The more responsibility (and less supervision) you have, the more likely it is that you are not entitled to overtime.  And vice versa.

Confused?  Curious?  Just want to chat?  Contact us.  An employment lawyer is standing by to speak to you right now.

Can you get overtime if paid salary?

Are you entitled to overtime if paid salary?  Maybe.

How you are paid does not impact whether or not you are entitled to overtime.  This is true regardless of whether you are paid by the hour, by the day or by the week.  It also holds true if you are paid an annual salary. What matters is what you do, not how you are paid.  Whether or not you are exempt from federal and state overtime laws depends almost entirely on the nature of your work.

A common trick used by unscrupulous employers is to pay an otherwise non-exempt (i.e. entitled to overtime) employee a "salary" so that the employee - erroneously - believes that he/she is not entitled to overtime.  The employer's decision to pay a salary does not change the employer's obligation to pay certain employees time and a half for hours over forty in a week.  Another misconception is that if someone has a "manager" or "supervisor" title that they are not entitled to overtime.  Titles do not matter - only what you do matters.

While how an employee is paid (salary versus hourly) may impact the calculation of damages (i.e. how much you could win in a lawsuit), it will not impact liability (i.e. whether the employee is entitled to overtime compensation to begin with).

If you believe that you have been denied overtime, or if you have questions about overtime if paid salary, you should contact us today.  Consultations are free - you have nothing to lose.

For more information:

Overtime Law Basics - Debunking Overtime Myths

Q&A - NY Overtime Law

 

 

 

What can a NYC employment lawyer do for you?

A lot, actually. A good NYC employment lawyer can help you in a lot of ways you might not be aware of. This article lays out some of the ways that the NYC employment lawyers at our firm can assist you. While this article focuses primarily on NYC Employment Lawyers, it is just as applicable to employment lawyers outside of New York City – it just so happens that we work here.

  • A NYC Employment Lawyer can work with you behind the scenes.

One of the most common misconceptions about employment attorneys – in fact about nearly all attorneys – is that as soon as you’ve hired an attorney, you are going to court. Nothing can be further from the truth. A good employment attorney will start out by working with you behind the scenes to help guide your actions. This is especially useful when you are still employed, but having issues at work (e.g. harassment).

  • A NYC Employment Lawyer can help you get severance.

If your employment has been terminated, an employment attorney can help you get a severance. Contrary to popular belief, most employees are not entitled to severance. In reality, when employees get what they call a “severance agreement,” what they are really getting is a “severance agreement and release.” In exchange for some money (severance) from the company, the employee agrees not to sue (release). An employment attorney can find the leverage points to get severance. For more information on severance, you can look at our other articles. We do a lot of severance work here.

  • If you have already been offered severance, a NYC Employment Lawyer can help you get more severance.

The only thing better than severance, is more severance. You don’t necessarily have to take the employer’s first offer. If you are over 40, the law requires at least 21 days to consider any offer of severance. Use this time to contact an employment lawyer. A good one will help you turn some severance into more severance.

  • A NYC Employment Lawyer can negotiate with your employer

Often, our firm negotiates directly with the employer to get a better severance for our clients.  If you have been offered a severance, consider contacting an employment attorney for help.

  •  A NYC Employment Lawyer can file a lawsuit against your employer.

We put this one last for a reason.  Lawyers are probably best known for filing lawsuits, but most lawyers provide services so that their clients can avoid litigation altogether.  However, if you are interested in filing a lawsuit against your employer, take a look at our practice areas, these might give you an idea of the sorts of issues that employment lawyers can help you with.

If you need more information or a free consultation, feel free to contact us.  We would be happy to help.

 

Courts Rule Alien Workers Have Rights Under FLSA

In March, 2013 Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals held that “there is nothing in the [Fair Labor Standards (“FLSA”)] that would allow us to conclude that undocumented aliens, although protected by the Act, are nevertheless barred from recovering unpaid wages thereunder.”  Lamonica v. Safe Hurricane Shutters, Inc.  An undocumented alien’s “ability to recover unpaid wages under the FLSA does not depend upon his immigration status.” Four months later, on July 29, 2013, another federal appellate court, the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that, “aliens, authorized to work or not, may recover unpaid and underpaid wages under the [Fair Labor Standards Act].”Lucas v. Jerusalem Cafe, LLC.

The United States Department of Labor’s policy was and is to enforce the FLSA “without regard to whether an employee is documented or undocumented.”

Although it is still unclear to the exact extent that these rulings will affect illegal alien workers, one thing is clear: the FLSA protects alien workers from being underpaid or unpaid.

Q&A: NY Overtime Law | NY Overtime Pay

Do I have an overtime claim? If you think that you may have an overtime claim, chances are that you do.  Below are a few frequently asked questions about New York Overtime Law that can help you to determine whether you have an overtime claim or a claim under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) or NY Overtime Law Law.  If you think you are entitled to overtime, you should contact us for a free consultation.

Q: What do the terms overtime hours and overtime pay mean?

Overtime hours means the time an employee works more than 40 hours per work week.  Under federal law and the NY Overtime Law, overtime pay must equal at least one and one-half times an employee's regular rate of pay. So, if an employee regularly makes $10/hour, that employee is entitled to make $15/hour for all the overtime hours he or she works.

Q: Who must be paid overtime pay?

Most employees are entitled to overtime pay.  You are probably entitled to overtime pay unless your job is an "executive," "administrative," and "professional" positions.  Whether or not you fall into one of these categories depends on the specific nature of your job.  If you have questions about NY Overtime Law, you should talk to a lawyer.

Q: What if I have no written records or proof of the hours I worked?

You do not need written records or proof of the number of hours you worked. It is the employer's duty to maintain certain records regarding your work hours and pay.  If your employer does not have those records, your testimony under oath will be sufficient to prove your claim.

Q: Do I have to be paid overtime pay for working more than eight hours in one day?

No. Overtime pay must only be paid when you work more than 40 hours in week, and not more than eight hours in any one day.

Q: What if my employer tells me that I am an independent contractor?

You may still be entitled to overtime pay because your employer may be wrongly telling you that you are an independent contractor. Whether or not you are an independent contractor depends on a variety of factors that we will need to discuss with you before we can give you an answer.

Q: What if I work 30 hours in one week and 50 hours in the next week, can my employer average the two weeks to avoid paying me overtime?

No. This is a common method employers use to avoid paying overtime. The averaging of workweeks is expressly prohibited by law. You are entitled to receive overtime pay for each individual week you work more than 40 hours. In the above example, you are entitled to receive overtime pay for the 10 hours you worked more than 40 hours in week two.

Q: Is it legal that I am paid "comp time" instead of overtime?

Unless you work for the state or federal government, an employer providing compensatory or "comp time" instead of overtime pay is illegal.

Q: My employer tells me I am exempt from the overtime pay laws, am I?

Not necessarily. You are exempt based on your job duties and responsibilities and not based on what your employer calls you. It makes no difference if your employer calls you exempt or gives you a job title such as "manager" or "supervisor." It is a common practice for employers to give workers the title of "assistant manager" to avoid paying overtime when those employees are not exempt and should be paid overtime.

Q: Can I still be entitled to overtime pay if I am a salaried rather than hourly employee?

Yes. This is one of the common misconceptions about overtime pay. You are not exempt just because you are paid a weekly salary. If you are not otherwise exempt under the FLSA, your employer must convert your weekly salary to an hourly rate and pay you time and a half for all hours worked in excess of 40 hours.

Q: When should I file a claim against my employer?

The longer you wait the less overtime pay you may be able to recover. It is also best to promptly pursue your claim so that time records and witnesses are readily available.

Q: Can my employer fire me for bringing an overtime claim against it?

No. It is illegal for an employer to fire or in any way retaliate against an employee because he or she has filed a claim for overtime against the employer. We will help protect you if your employer tries to retaliate against you for filing an overtime claim.

Q: What should I do if I believe that I am owed overtime pay?

You should seek legal advice. The overtime laws are highly technical and we can help apply the law to your special situation. Our experienced NY Overtime Lawyers provide free consultations and will tell you if you are owed earned wages and if we can help you.

Q: How much does it cost to file a claim?

In most cases, all costs for overtime and unpaid wage cases will be advanced by our firm. Because our fee is typically contingent on a recovery from the employer, the firm does not get paid or reimbursed for expenses until the recovery is made.

Q: Do I have to pay attorneys fees to you if I lose my case?

No. We will only receive a fee if we are successful in resolving your claim.