Employment Lawyer

I Am Being Asked To Resign - What Should I Do?

It happens from time to time: an employer offers an employee an opportunity to resign instead of being laid off.  Seems like the employer is doing a nice thing – allowing the employee to “save face” by resigning rather than going through the indignity of being let go.  But appearances can be deceiving.  All else being equal, when presented with this option, you should not resign.  Rather, it is time to negotiate.

Just because your employer asks you to resign, that does not mean that you have to.  Assuming you are an employee at will, quitting is entirely up to you.  You can (but don’t have to) quit at any time for any reason.  Similarly, an employer can terminate you at any time for any reason.  Think about that for a moment – your employer has the power to fire you at any time for any reason, yet they are asking you to quit.  Seems weird, right?  That’s because it is.

Before you accept your employer’s offer to resign, consider asking these questions first:

1.      Why do you want me to resign?

2.      Will the company oppose my application for employment?

3.      How will reference requests be handled?

4.      Am I getting severance?

5.      Is there an agreement for my attorney and me to review?

Reasons not to quit:

1.      You might have valid discrimination claims against the company.  Most employment discrimination lawsuits require that you suffer an “adverse employment action” in order to sue.  An adverse employment action is something that the employer does to make your employment worse (i.e. fire, suspend, demote, etc.).  If you quit, though, the adverse employment action was committed by YOU, not the company.  It is pretty hard to argue that you were fired because of your race, age, gender, etc. if you voluntarily resigned.

2.      You might be denied unemployment.  Generally, employees who quit of their own accord do not get unemployment.  Money matters; if nothing else, by resigning, you may be giving up your right to collect unemployment, whereas if you are laid off, you likely will get unemployment benefits.

3.      You are not getting anything.  There is an inherent quid pro quo to the employer- employee relationship.  Why are you going to give the company something (by quitting), for nothing?  You do what the employer asks you to do for pay.  Quitting is no different.

What an employment lawyer can do for you:

Disclaimer – I’m biased.  I help employees end their employment relationships (good and bad) all the time.  Employment lawyers can help you in several ways.  Below are just a few:

1.      Negotiate Severance.  This firm specializes in severance.  Why not get some money on the way out in exchange for the promises that go along with your agreement to resign?

2.      Negotiate References.  Whether you resign or your employment is terminated, it is critical to have some control over how the end of your employment is communicated to potential employers.  We can help you with this and get agreed-upon terms for how your employment is described to others.

3.      Negotiate other Benefits.  Leaving employment has many factors other than just severance pay and references.  We can help negotiate your insurance coverage, stock options, end date, transition assistance, and application for unemployment.  Our goal as employment lawyers is to assist you in a seamless transition from your old job to your future.  If you are being asked to resign, contact us today to schedule a consultation. 

EEOC Releases Workplace Discrimination Charge Statistics

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) has made released its workplace discrimination litigation statistics for 2012.  In total, the EEOC received 99,412 charges of employment discrimination and unlawful termination from October 1, 2011 and September 30, 2012 (versus 99,947 charges in 2011).  The EEOC filed 122 in 2012 (as compared to 261 in 2011).  The 2012 lawsuits resulted in a total monetary recovery of $44.2 million. The EEOC enforces many federal unlawful discrimination statutes, prohibiting workplace discrimination, including Title VII (which covers race, gender, national origin, and sexual orientation, among other protected classes); the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (age discrimination); the Americans with Disabilities Act (disability discrimination); the Equal Pay Act (pay discrimination); and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (genetic information discrimination).

The most prevalent charges filed with the EEOC in 2012 were for retaliation (38.1%); race discrimination (33.7%) and sex discrimination (30.5%).

If you feel that you have suffered any workplace discrimination, harassment or have been unlawfully terminated, please contact us.

NY Employment Law -- What is the Duty to Mitigate?

If your employment has been unlawfully terminated, you may be entitled to recover damages in a variety of forms, including front pay.  Front pay is pay to a former employee for monies that he/she would have earned, but for the unlawful termination of employment. However, an employee who was unlawfully terminated cannot just sit at home and wait idly to collect front pay.  The law imposes what is called a "duty to mitigate," which means that the employee has the duty to mitigate his or her losses. If an employee fails to look for work, he/she will not be eligible for an award of front pay during any period in which he/she is not actively seeking work.  The phrase used by the courts is that the employee must be "ready, willing, and able" to obtain employment.  If, instead, the employee elects to stay home, he/she is considered to have withdrawn from the job market and, as a result, is ineligible to receive an award of front pay.  However, if the employee makes constant and good-faith efforts to seek similar employment, he/she is eligible to receive front pay if victorious at trial.

The cases are very fact specific and difficult to predict.  However, at least one thing is settled -- an employee who makes no attempt to look for work after an allegedly unlawful termination is deemed to have voluntarily withdrawn from the job market and is ineligible for an award of front pay for that time.  If you have any questions about your NY unlawful termination or the duty to mitigate, please contact us.

What is Wrongful Termination in New York?

NY Employment Lawyer
NY Employment Lawyer

Our NY employment attorneys often receive calls from potential clients who believe they suffered Wrongful Termination.  However, the term Wrongful Termination is misleading because in New York (and most other states), employment is “at will.” unless there a written agreement.  This generally means that employers can fire or terminate an employee for any reason, or for no reason at all.There are some exceptions to this rule.  For example,

  • Employers cannot discriminate against you on the basis of age, sex or gender, race, national origin, disability or perceived disability, pregnancy status, marital status, or sexual orientation and terminate you because you fall into one of these categories.
  • If you have an employment contract with your employer, which states that you cannot be fired without just cause for a specific period of time.

Otherwise, employers may terminate employees for any reason or for no reason at all.  You may find this surprising, but employers may fire you if they don’t like you, or even if they just don’t like the clothes you’re wearing.  It is perfectly legal for employers to be mean when they fire you or to have totally arbitrary reasons for firing you.

However, it is illegal for your employer to terminate you for a discriminatory reason.  if you believe you have been fired forreasons that may constitute employment discrimination or a breach of contract , then you should consider consulting with an attorney.  Our NY employment attorneys are here to help -- please contact us for a consultation if you feel that you have been a victim of wrongful termination or discrimination of any kind.

What is Constructive Discharge?

What is Constructive Discharge? Constructive discharge is where an employee quits work for good cause.  However, most courts are reluctant to find that an employee was constructively discharged. The standard is usually that no reasonable employee would have tolerated the conditions of employment.  A humiliating demotion, punitive transfer or hostility toward you are among the types of changes that might entitle you to claim constructive discharge after you resign. For example, if you resign because of intolerable discrimination or sexual harassment, or because your employer transferred or demoted you to an undesirable position in retaliation for reporting a wrongdoing, your immediate, resulting resignation might constitute constructive discharge. Our experienced New York Employment Attorneys have seen many cases of extreme harassment that did not constitute constructive discharge by the employer.

We advise that you don’t quit.

Instead you should

  1. Look for another job,
  2. Complain to HR – and put it in writing, and
  3. Contact us – our experienced New York Employment Lawyers can help!

Remember, just because your employment situation is bad, it does not mean that you were constructively discharged. If a court determines that you quit - and did not suffer constructive discharge - your employment case may be dead in the water. We strongly advise you to contact an employment lawyer, well versed in constructive discharge and to stick it out at work until we develop a plan for your departure. Your job matters and you deserve to work in a discrimination and intimidation free workplace. Contact our employment lawyers today for help.

What is workplace retaliation?

Our New York Employment Lawyers are often contacted by employees who believe that they are being illegally retaliated against. Workplace retaliation is unlawful. If you feel you have been retaliated against for making complaints in the workplace, you should know if you are protected under the law.  Our experienced employment lawyers can help yo to determine if you are being retaliated against. Think about these questions to see if you might be a victim of unlawful retaliation:

  1. Have you recently objected to any activity, policy, or practice of the employer which is in violation of a law, rule, or regulation?
  2. Have you recently refused to participate in any activity, policy, or practice of the employer which is in violation of a law, rule, or regulation?
  3. Have you recently disclosed, or threatened to disclose, to any appropriate governmental agency an activity, policy, or practice of the employer that is in violation of a law, rule, or regulation?
  4. Have you recently provided information to, or testified before, any appropriate governmental agency, person, or entity conducting an investigation, hearing, or inquiry into an alleged violation of a law, rule, or regulation by the employer?

Here are some examples of other types of complaints where the law protects you from retaliation.

Discrimination: If you are the victim of discrimination or harassment based upon your race, age, sex, religion, national origin, color, disability, genetic information, disability, sexual orientation, or your association with a person in one of these categories, then you have to follow your employer’s published discrimination/harassment policy and report it.

Wage/overtime violations: If you’re terminated for objecting to failure to pay wages owed or failure to pay overtime, you may be protected from retaliation under the Fair Labor Standards Act or your state’s wage/hour laws.

What to do:

  1. Put it in writing even if the employer’s policy says to have a meeting. You can present the written document at the meeting.  That way you have proof that you complained about something that’s protected.
  2. If you complain, keep it professional and to the point. Stick to the facts.
  3. Your employer is entitled to investigate your complaint. That means even if they have a policy of keeping your complaint confidential, your boss, the person you’re complaining about, and your witnesses and other coworkers will probably find out about it. Be prepared for that to happen, and be ready to report retaliation.
  4. If you are retaliated against for reporting something illegal, put your complaint of retaliation in writing. If the retaliation doesn’t stop, or if you get fired, disciplined, demoted, or a pay cut as a result, contact an employment attorney.

If you have any questions, or think you are being unlawfully retaliated against, contact us.  Our New York Employment Lawyers can help.

Do I Need An Employment Lawyer?

Do I need an employment lawyer? Our experienced New York Employment Lawyers get calls all the time for people who are not sure whether they need an employment lawyer. You cannot bring an action just because you think it was “unfair” to terminate your employment.  There is no such thing as “unlawful termination,” or “wrongful termination.”  Unless you have an employment contract, there is really no such thing as wrongful termination.  So how do you decide whether or not to contact an employment lawyer?

Why …

There are times during the course of your employment when you may need an attorney. For example:

Deadlines: Employment laws are a morass of confusing deadlines and procedural requirements.  If you do it yourself, you might miss something and lose your claim.

Confusing claims: There are some employment laws that you might not know about and there are some laws you think exist, that may not.

Being taken seriously: Some employers will not take you seriously unless you have representation.

Confrontation and advocacy: Some people do not want to find themselves in a confrontational situation or advocating for themselves. Sometimes it’s better to have someone else advocate for you.  Attorneys are trained advocates.

When …

You should contact a lawyer immediately if:

Your current or former employer sues or threatens to sue you;

You are being asked to sign an something that you don’t fully understand, like an employment agreement, non-compete, confidentiality clause, or arbitration agreement;

You have been retaliated against for complaining about discrimination or something illegal the employer has done;

You are not being paid all the wages you’re owed (including time and a half for overtime);

You are misclassified as exempt from overtime or as an independent contractor;

You believe that you have been a victim of discrimination based upon your race, sex, religion, ethnicity, disability, age, pregnancy, national origin, color, genetic information, objecting to discrimination, or request for medical leave to care for yourself or a family member.

Do I have a case?

That’s the million dollar question, isn’t it?  The devil is in the details, but the following checklist should be a good place to start:

Cases involving termination, demotion, or suspension without pay

If you answer “yes” to any of these questions, you may have a claim. Definitely contact us if any of these occurred shortly before you were terminated, demoted, suspended, or otherwise disciplined:

●          You made a worker’s compensation claim shortly before being fired.

●          You recently objected to, refused to participate in, or reported illegal activity or discrimination by the company

●          You recently had surgery, revealed the existence of a medical condition, genetic information or pregnancy.

●          Your employer made a false statement of fact (as opposed to opinion) about you to someone outside the company, such as a potential employer.

●          You recently performed jury duty.

●          You recently served in the military.

●          You recently took family or medical leave.

●          You recently served as a witness in a lawsuit or provided testimony or evidence to EEOC.

●          You recently engaged in activity for the benefit of co-workers with respect to terms and conditions of employment.

●          Your employer fail to pay you for all hours worked, or fail to pay overtime if you worked over 40 hours per week.  Many times, employees are misclassified as exempt and will be owed back wages for up to 2 - 3 years.

Discrimination claims

It is not illegal to discriminate against you for being you. Your boss does not have to like you.  He/she does not have to be nice to you.  However, if the discrimination or harassment fits into one of the categories below, you should contact us to find out more about your rights and your responsibility to report it before you make a claim.

● Race ● Sex ● Sexual harassment ● Religion ● Ethnicity ● Disability ● Age ● Pregnancy ● National origin ● Color ● Genetic information ● Retaliation for objecting to discrimination

If you feel that you have been treated differently than others of a different race, age, sex, national origin, disability, religion, sexual orientation, or color you should contact us.

What can my employer do during my FMLA leave?

Our New York Employment Lawyers are regularly asked about what an employer can do when an employee is on FMLA leave.  Here are some points to consider: Your employer can make you use your paid time off.  Your employer may require you to take paid leave concurrently with their unpaid FMLA leave.  This may include vacation time, paid personal leave, and paid sick and medical leave.  The employer may waive any procedural requirements for the taking of paid leave and you are always entitled to their unpaid FMLA leave even if you do not meet the employer’s requirements for taking paid leave. If the employer is not making you use your paid time off for the intermittent leave, you should be entitled to use it like anyone else.

Your employer may communicate with your health care provider to get information required by the FMLA certification form.  Employers are prohibited from asking for information other than what is required by the certification form.  If the employer determines that a medical certification is not complete or is insufficient, the employer must provide written notification to you of what information is lacking and give you seven calendar days to cure the issue.

Your employer may require the certification to address your ability to perform the essential functions of your job. In the event that reasonable job safety concerns exist, an employer can require a fitness-for-duty certification before you may return to work when you take intermittent leave.

Your employer is not allowed to use your FMLA leave against you.  The employer cannot write you up for poor attendance, give you poor performance evaluations for excessive absenteeism or for failing to perform while you were on leave, demote you or fire you for taking leave.

Our New York Employment Lawyers handle FMLA and related cases from start to finish.  If you have any questions, please contact us.  All e-mails are answered by an attorney within 24 hours.

Should I Quit My Job?

NYC Severance Attorneys
NYC Severance Attorneys

Should I quit my job? Our experienced New York Employment Lawyers are asked this question all the time.  Usually, the answer is NO.  If you are thinking about quitting, contact one of our experienced New York Employment Lawyers and Severance Agreement Lawyers.  We can help advise you and possibly soften your landing with a severance agreement. In most states, harassment and bullying are not illegal.  These are only illegal if they are due to race, age, sex, disability, color, national origin, religion, pregnancy, marital status, sexual orientation, genetic information, objecting to an illegal practice of the employer, making a worker’s compensation claim, taking Family and Medical Leave, your testimony under subpoena, serving on jury duty, or some other legally-protected category.

What you should do is report the harassment or bullying to human resources or whoever the appropriate person at your company is.  Make the report in writing.  You have to give your employer time to investigate and take action to stop it.

You should also consider whether you are a victim of constructive discharge. A humiliating demotion, punitive transfer or hostility toward you are among the types of changes that might entitle you to claim constructive discharge after you resign. For example, if you resign because of intolerable discrimination or sexual harassment, or because your employer transferred or demoted you to an undesirable position in retaliation for reporting a wrongdoing, your immediate, resulting resignation might constitute constructive discharge.

Nevertheless, the law hates quitters – don’t do it.  If you want to leave, please contact us – we can help.

New York Severance Agreement Lawyers

Our New York Severance Agreement Lawyer Can Help You Negotiate a Better Severance Agreement

Our New York Severance Agreement Lawyers can help you. Your employer does not have to give you severance.  If you have lost your job, you may be entitled to severance pay under your company's severance policy or practice, or under your individual employment contract.

Our New York Severance Agreement Lawyers may be able to increase the amount of money you receive, or add benefits to your New York Severance Package like as outplacement services, extended medical benefits or other insurance, or a better job reference.

If you have lost your job, our New York Severance Agreement Lawyers we may be able to:

  •                 Get you a severance package
  •                 Review the severance package you have already been offered
  •                 Negotiate a better severance package for you

Our New York Severance Agreement Lawyers are here to protect your legal rights.  Contact us to speak with an attorney.  All calls or e-mails are returned within 24 hours.

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As of May, 2014, our success rate in negotiating enhanced severance packages is over 90%.  That being said, we obviously don't take every single case that comes our way.  Our New York Severance Agreement Lawyers are smart, aggressive and dedicated to getting the best results for our clients.