Employee Rights

I Am Being Asked To Resign - What Should I Do?

It happens from time to time: an employer offers an employee an opportunity to resign instead of being laid off.  Seems like the employer is doing a nice thing – allowing the employee to “save face” by resigning rather than going through the indignity of being let go.  But appearances can be deceiving.  All else being equal, when presented with this option, you should not resign.  Rather, it is time to negotiate.

Just because your employer asks you to resign, that does not mean that you have to.  Assuming you are an employee at will, quitting is entirely up to you.  You can (but don’t have to) quit at any time for any reason.  Similarly, an employer can terminate you at any time for any reason.  Think about that for a moment – your employer has the power to fire you at any time for any reason, yet they are asking you to quit.  Seems weird, right?  That’s because it is.

Before you accept your employer’s offer to resign, consider asking these questions first:

1.      Why do you want me to resign?

2.      Will the company oppose my application for employment?

3.      How will reference requests be handled?

4.      Am I getting severance?

5.      Is there an agreement for my attorney and me to review?

Reasons not to quit:

1.      You might have valid discrimination claims against the company.  Most employment discrimination lawsuits require that you suffer an “adverse employment action” in order to sue.  An adverse employment action is something that the employer does to make your employment worse (i.e. fire, suspend, demote, etc.).  If you quit, though, the adverse employment action was committed by YOU, not the company.  It is pretty hard to argue that you were fired because of your race, age, gender, etc. if you voluntarily resigned.

2.      You might be denied unemployment.  Generally, employees who quit of their own accord do not get unemployment.  Money matters; if nothing else, by resigning, you may be giving up your right to collect unemployment, whereas if you are laid off, you likely will get unemployment benefits.

3.      You are not getting anything.  There is an inherent quid pro quo to the employer- employee relationship.  Why are you going to give the company something (by quitting), for nothing?  You do what the employer asks you to do for pay.  Quitting is no different.

What an employment lawyer can do for you:

Disclaimer – I’m biased.  I help employees end their employment relationships (good and bad) all the time.  Employment lawyers can help you in several ways.  Below are just a few:

1.      Negotiate Severance.  This firm specializes in severance.  Why not get some money on the way out in exchange for the promises that go along with your agreement to resign?

2.      Negotiate References.  Whether you resign or your employment is terminated, it is critical to have some control over how the end of your employment is communicated to potential employers.  We can help you with this and get agreed-upon terms for how your employment is described to others.

3.      Negotiate other Benefits.  Leaving employment has many factors other than just severance pay and references.  We can help negotiate your insurance coverage, stock options, end date, transition assistance, and application for unemployment.  Our goal as employment lawyers is to assist you in a seamless transition from your old job to your future.  If you are being asked to resign, contact us today to schedule a consultation. 

New York Disability Discrimination Law | Unlawful Termination – Disability Discrimination

New York Disability Discrimination Law | Unlawful Termination – Disability Discrimination

Extended Leave of Absence May Be a Reasonable Accommodation Under New York City Human Rights Law

In LaCourt v. Shenanigans Knits, Ltd., No. 102391/11  (N.Y. Sup. Ct., N.Y. Cty., Nov. 14, 2012), an employee informed her supervisor of her recent breast cancer diagnosis and decision to undergo a double mastectomy.  Prior to her scheduled surgery date, the employee met with the company’s president, who informed her that the company was discharging her because of the significant recovery time required for her surgery and the importance of her position. Employee filed suit, alleging disability discrimination in violation of the New York State Human Rights Law and the New York City Human Rights Law.  The employer argued that the employee could not perform the essential functions of her job because she planned to be absent from work for more than three months.  The court rejected this argument and held that the company ignored its legal obligation to consider a reasonable accommodation and to engage in the interactive process.  While an employer is not required to hold a position open indefinitely, the Court held that a temporary leave of absence, even an extended leave, can be a reasonable accommodation. Because here, the employer did not engage in the interactive process at all and failed to establish that they would have suffered an undue hardship by granting the plaintiff a three-month leave of absence, the Court held that the employee had stated a valid cause of action under the New York City Human Rights law.

If you feel you have been discriminated on due to a disability, or are the victim of unlawful termination, please contact us.

What is Wrongful Termination in New York?

NY Employment Lawyer
NY Employment Lawyer

Our NY employment attorneys often receive calls from potential clients who believe they suffered Wrongful Termination.  However, the term Wrongful Termination is misleading because in New York (and most other states), employment is “at will.” unless there a written agreement.  This generally means that employers can fire or terminate an employee for any reason, or for no reason at all.There are some exceptions to this rule.  For example,

  • Employers cannot discriminate against you on the basis of age, sex or gender, race, national origin, disability or perceived disability, pregnancy status, marital status, or sexual orientation and terminate you because you fall into one of these categories.
  • If you have an employment contract with your employer, which states that you cannot be fired without just cause for a specific period of time.

Otherwise, employers may terminate employees for any reason or for no reason at all.  You may find this surprising, but employers may fire you if they don’t like you, or even if they just don’t like the clothes you’re wearing.  It is perfectly legal for employers to be mean when they fire you or to have totally arbitrary reasons for firing you.

However, it is illegal for your employer to terminate you for a discriminatory reason.  if you believe you have been fired forreasons that may constitute employment discrimination or a breach of contract , then you should consider consulting with an attorney.  Our NY employment attorneys are here to help -- please contact us for a consultation if you feel that you have been a victim of wrongful termination or discrimination of any kind.

What is workplace retaliation?

Our New York Employment Lawyers are often contacted by employees who believe that they are being illegally retaliated against. Workplace retaliation is unlawful. If you feel you have been retaliated against for making complaints in the workplace, you should know if you are protected under the law.  Our experienced employment lawyers can help yo to determine if you are being retaliated against. Think about these questions to see if you might be a victim of unlawful retaliation:

  1. Have you recently objected to any activity, policy, or practice of the employer which is in violation of a law, rule, or regulation?
  2. Have you recently refused to participate in any activity, policy, or practice of the employer which is in violation of a law, rule, or regulation?
  3. Have you recently disclosed, or threatened to disclose, to any appropriate governmental agency an activity, policy, or practice of the employer that is in violation of a law, rule, or regulation?
  4. Have you recently provided information to, or testified before, any appropriate governmental agency, person, or entity conducting an investigation, hearing, or inquiry into an alleged violation of a law, rule, or regulation by the employer?

Here are some examples of other types of complaints where the law protects you from retaliation.

Discrimination: If you are the victim of discrimination or harassment based upon your race, age, sex, religion, national origin, color, disability, genetic information, disability, sexual orientation, or your association with a person in one of these categories, then you have to follow your employer’s published discrimination/harassment policy and report it.

Wage/overtime violations: If you’re terminated for objecting to failure to pay wages owed or failure to pay overtime, you may be protected from retaliation under the Fair Labor Standards Act or your state’s wage/hour laws.

What to do:

  1. Put it in writing even if the employer’s policy says to have a meeting. You can present the written document at the meeting.  That way you have proof that you complained about something that’s protected.
  2. If you complain, keep it professional and to the point. Stick to the facts.
  3. Your employer is entitled to investigate your complaint. That means even if they have a policy of keeping your complaint confidential, your boss, the person you’re complaining about, and your witnesses and other coworkers will probably find out about it. Be prepared for that to happen, and be ready to report retaliation.
  4. If you are retaliated against for reporting something illegal, put your complaint of retaliation in writing. If the retaliation doesn’t stop, or if you get fired, disciplined, demoted, or a pay cut as a result, contact an employment attorney.

If you have any questions, or think you are being unlawfully retaliated against, contact us.  Our New York Employment Lawyers can help.

Do I Need An Employment Lawyer?

Do I need an employment lawyer? Our experienced New York Employment Lawyers get calls all the time for people who are not sure whether they need an employment lawyer. You cannot bring an action just because you think it was “unfair” to terminate your employment.  There is no such thing as “unlawful termination,” or “wrongful termination.”  Unless you have an employment contract, there is really no such thing as wrongful termination.  So how do you decide whether or not to contact an employment lawyer?

Why …

There are times during the course of your employment when you may need an attorney. For example:

Deadlines: Employment laws are a morass of confusing deadlines and procedural requirements.  If you do it yourself, you might miss something and lose your claim.

Confusing claims: There are some employment laws that you might not know about and there are some laws you think exist, that may not.

Being taken seriously: Some employers will not take you seriously unless you have representation.

Confrontation and advocacy: Some people do not want to find themselves in a confrontational situation or advocating for themselves. Sometimes it’s better to have someone else advocate for you.  Attorneys are trained advocates.

When …

You should contact a lawyer immediately if:

Your current or former employer sues or threatens to sue you;

You are being asked to sign an something that you don’t fully understand, like an employment agreement, non-compete, confidentiality clause, or arbitration agreement;

You have been retaliated against for complaining about discrimination or something illegal the employer has done;

You are not being paid all the wages you’re owed (including time and a half for overtime);

You are misclassified as exempt from overtime or as an independent contractor;

You believe that you have been a victim of discrimination based upon your race, sex, religion, ethnicity, disability, age, pregnancy, national origin, color, genetic information, objecting to discrimination, or request for medical leave to care for yourself or a family member.

Do I have a case?

That’s the million dollar question, isn’t it?  The devil is in the details, but the following checklist should be a good place to start:

Cases involving termination, demotion, or suspension without pay

If you answer “yes” to any of these questions, you may have a claim. Definitely contact us if any of these occurred shortly before you were terminated, demoted, suspended, or otherwise disciplined:

●          You made a worker’s compensation claim shortly before being fired.

●          You recently objected to, refused to participate in, or reported illegal activity or discrimination by the company

●          You recently had surgery, revealed the existence of a medical condition, genetic information or pregnancy.

●          Your employer made a false statement of fact (as opposed to opinion) about you to someone outside the company, such as a potential employer.

●          You recently performed jury duty.

●          You recently served in the military.

●          You recently took family or medical leave.

●          You recently served as a witness in a lawsuit or provided testimony or evidence to EEOC.

●          You recently engaged in activity for the benefit of co-workers with respect to terms and conditions of employment.

●          Your employer fail to pay you for all hours worked, or fail to pay overtime if you worked over 40 hours per week.  Many times, employees are misclassified as exempt and will be owed back wages for up to 2 - 3 years.

Discrimination claims

It is not illegal to discriminate against you for being you. Your boss does not have to like you.  He/she does not have to be nice to you.  However, if the discrimination or harassment fits into one of the categories below, you should contact us to find out more about your rights and your responsibility to report it before you make a claim.

● Race ● Sex ● Sexual harassment ● Religion ● Ethnicity ● Disability ● Age ● Pregnancy ● National origin ● Color ● Genetic information ● Retaliation for objecting to discrimination

If you feel that you have been treated differently than others of a different race, age, sex, national origin, disability, religion, sexual orientation, or color you should contact us.

What can my employer do during my FMLA leave?

Our New York Employment Lawyers are regularly asked about what an employer can do when an employee is on FMLA leave.  Here are some points to consider: Your employer can make you use your paid time off.  Your employer may require you to take paid leave concurrently with their unpaid FMLA leave.  This may include vacation time, paid personal leave, and paid sick and medical leave.  The employer may waive any procedural requirements for the taking of paid leave and you are always entitled to their unpaid FMLA leave even if you do not meet the employer’s requirements for taking paid leave. If the employer is not making you use your paid time off for the intermittent leave, you should be entitled to use it like anyone else.

Your employer may communicate with your health care provider to get information required by the FMLA certification form.  Employers are prohibited from asking for information other than what is required by the certification form.  If the employer determines that a medical certification is not complete or is insufficient, the employer must provide written notification to you of what information is lacking and give you seven calendar days to cure the issue.

Your employer may require the certification to address your ability to perform the essential functions of your job. In the event that reasonable job safety concerns exist, an employer can require a fitness-for-duty certification before you may return to work when you take intermittent leave.

Your employer is not allowed to use your FMLA leave against you.  The employer cannot write you up for poor attendance, give you poor performance evaluations for excessive absenteeism or for failing to perform while you were on leave, demote you or fire you for taking leave.

Our New York Employment Lawyers handle FMLA and related cases from start to finish.  If you have any questions, please contact us.  All e-mails are answered by an attorney within 24 hours.

New York Severance Agreement Lawyers -- What to Consider Before You Sign!

It is extremely important to understand all of the terms of your New York severance agreement and the impact that the terms of the severance agreement will have on you in the future.  Before you sign your New York severance agreement, here are a few things you should consider:

  • Does the severance agreement contain a non-compete clause?  A non-compete is a provision that will prevent you from working for a competitor or another company for a specific time period (typically 1-2 years in NY and NJ).  If the agreement contains a non-compete clause, will it prevent you from working in the future.  One thing to consider is whether the severance agreement will compensate your for the entire non-compete period.
  • Does the severance agreement provide you with all of the benefits that you were entitled to during your employment (e.g., 401(k), pension, life insurance)?
  • Does the agreement contain all promises that were made to you verbally?  If the promises are not in the agreement, they will most likely not be enforceable.  We commonly see employers promise to pay vacation but fail to include it in the severance agreement.
  • Do you have any possible claims against the employer that you are waiving as a result of entering into the severance agreement?  Most employment attorneys will offer you a free consultation.  Take advantage of the free consultation to determine whether you have a potential claim against your employer prior to signing any severance agreement.

Please contact us if you have any questions regarding your New York severance agreement or would like a free consultation regarding your potential claims.

Q&A: NY Overtime Law | NY Overtime Pay

Do I have an overtime claim? If you think that you may have an overtime claim, chances are that you do.  Below are a few frequently asked questions about New York Overtime Law that can help you to determine whether you have an overtime claim or a claim under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) or NY Overtime Law Law.  If you think you are entitled to overtime, you should contact us for a free consultation.

Q: What do the terms overtime hours and overtime pay mean?

Overtime hours means the time an employee works more than 40 hours per work week.  Under federal law and the NY Overtime Law, overtime pay must equal at least one and one-half times an employee's regular rate of pay. So, if an employee regularly makes $10/hour, that employee is entitled to make $15/hour for all the overtime hours he or she works.

Q: Who must be paid overtime pay?

Most employees are entitled to overtime pay.  You are probably entitled to overtime pay unless your job is an "executive," "administrative," and "professional" positions.  Whether or not you fall into one of these categories depends on the specific nature of your job.  If you have questions about NY Overtime Law, you should talk to a lawyer.

Q: What if I have no written records or proof of the hours I worked?

You do not need written records or proof of the number of hours you worked. It is the employer's duty to maintain certain records regarding your work hours and pay.  If your employer does not have those records, your testimony under oath will be sufficient to prove your claim.

Q: Do I have to be paid overtime pay for working more than eight hours in one day?

No. Overtime pay must only be paid when you work more than 40 hours in week, and not more than eight hours in any one day.

Q: What if my employer tells me that I am an independent contractor?

You may still be entitled to overtime pay because your employer may be wrongly telling you that you are an independent contractor. Whether or not you are an independent contractor depends on a variety of factors that we will need to discuss with you before we can give you an answer.

Q: What if I work 30 hours in one week and 50 hours in the next week, can my employer average the two weeks to avoid paying me overtime?

No. This is a common method employers use to avoid paying overtime. The averaging of workweeks is expressly prohibited by law. You are entitled to receive overtime pay for each individual week you work more than 40 hours. In the above example, you are entitled to receive overtime pay for the 10 hours you worked more than 40 hours in week two.

Q: Is it legal that I am paid "comp time" instead of overtime?

Unless you work for the state or federal government, an employer providing compensatory or "comp time" instead of overtime pay is illegal.

Q: My employer tells me I am exempt from the overtime pay laws, am I?

Not necessarily. You are exempt based on your job duties and responsibilities and not based on what your employer calls you. It makes no difference if your employer calls you exempt or gives you a job title such as "manager" or "supervisor." It is a common practice for employers to give workers the title of "assistant manager" to avoid paying overtime when those employees are not exempt and should be paid overtime.

Q: Can I still be entitled to overtime pay if I am a salaried rather than hourly employee?

Yes. This is one of the common misconceptions about overtime pay. You are not exempt just because you are paid a weekly salary. If you are not otherwise exempt under the FLSA, your employer must convert your weekly salary to an hourly rate and pay you time and a half for all hours worked in excess of 40 hours.

Q: When should I file a claim against my employer?

The longer you wait the less overtime pay you may be able to recover. It is also best to promptly pursue your claim so that time records and witnesses are readily available.

Q: Can my employer fire me for bringing an overtime claim against it?

No. It is illegal for an employer to fire or in any way retaliate against an employee because he or she has filed a claim for overtime against the employer. We will help protect you if your employer tries to retaliate against you for filing an overtime claim.

Q: What should I do if I believe that I am owed overtime pay?

You should seek legal advice. The overtime laws are highly technical and we can help apply the law to your special situation. Our experienced NY Overtime Lawyers provide free consultations and will tell you if you are owed earned wages and if we can help you.

Q: How much does it cost to file a claim?

In most cases, all costs for overtime and unpaid wage cases will be advanced by our firm. Because our fee is typically contingent on a recovery from the employer, the firm does not get paid or reimbursed for expenses until the recovery is made.

Q: Do I have to pay attorneys fees to you if I lose my case?

No. We will only receive a fee if we are successful in resolving your claim.

Is this Harassment Illegal? | NY Harassment Lawyers

Let our NY Harassment Lawyers help you. We receive many calls from potential clients inquiring whether the harassment they are experiencing at work is illegal.  Most people assume that the harassment is illegal because it is unfair, degrading and/or abusive.  However, NY Harassment Law does not protect employees unless the harassment is severe and pervasive AND is based on a protected characteristic.  This means that we need to be able to prove that the harassment you are suffering at work it a result of your race, gender, religion, disability, age, sexual orientation or other protected characteristic.  If that harassment is not based on one of these protected characteristics, it is not protected by the law.  Unfortunately, the law allows an employee to quit if he is unhappy with the work environment, but it does not protect the employee from the abuse unless the employee can meet the requirements for an intentional infliction of emotional distress claim. Our NY Harassment Lawyers can help you analyze your potential claims.

NYC Unlawful Termination Lawyers
NYC Unlawful Termination Lawyers

If you have questions regarding whether you are suffering illegal harassment, please contact our NY Employment Lawyers.

NY Severance Lawyer | NY Severance Agreement

NY Severance Lawyer | NY Severance Agreement A NY Severance Agreement Lawyermay be helpful in identifying and discussing with you potential issues in your NY Severance Agreement and answering any questions you may have related to your NY Severance Agreement.  Our NY Severance Agreement Lawyers handle NY Severance Agreements from top to bottom – from assessing your leverage points, to helping you negotiate a better severance package, to reviewing the final agreement.  Let our NY Severance Agreement Lawyers help you know and protect your rights.

NYC Employment Attorneys
NYC Employment Attorneys

If you have been offered a severance agreement, we can assist you in a variety of ways. We offer several different billing options including flat fee for review of a severance agreement, and a contingency fee basis for negotiation of severance agreement. We also understand that these are time sensitive matters, and we therefore usually get started within 24 hours of hearing from you. A NY Severance Lawyer can help you understand your agreement and, possibly, get a better severance agreement. You should understand what you are signing no matter what. Speak to a NY Severance Lawyer today for help with your agreement.

For assistance with your NY Severance Agreement, please contact a NY Severance Lawyer at our firm for a free initial consultation.