Overtime Law Basics - Debunking 5 Overtime Myths

Overtime Law Basics Basics - Five Common Misconceptions About Overtime Law

This is the first in our ongoing series of overtime law basics.  Below, we go through some of the most common misconceptions about overtime law.  You should educate yourself about your rights as an employee.  Especially when it comes to how you should get paid.  Any questions, call us at 646.524.6001 for a free consultation.

  1. Your title means nothing. Even if you have a “supervisor” title, you may be entitled to overtime. Just because you are called a supervisor, this does not necessarily mean that you are not entitled to overtime pay. There are several factors used to determine whether an employee is entitled to overtime, and none of these factors includes the employee’s title. Your title has nothing to do with your entitlement to overtime.
  2. How you are paid does not determine whether you can get overtime. If you are paid a salary, you may be entitled to overtime. Just like your title, how you are paid does not necessarily make you ineligible for overtime. In fact, many salaried employees are entitled to overtime based on what they do – not how they are paid. Employees paid on a salary basis are only exempt from overtime if they meet all of the requirements for certain exemptions under the Fair Labor Standards Act (Federal Law) or New York Labor Law (State Law).
  3. Your employer may not give you time off instead of overtime pay. Time off may not be provided instead of overtime pay. Only certain municipal, state or federal employers can provide time off in lieu of overtime pay. Private employers are forbidden from doing so – they have to pay overtime.
  4. All time worked, including time spent working from home counts towards your hours. Work from home is no different from work at the workplace. If you work from home, let your employer know about it – this time counts towards overtime.
  5. Time spent traveling for work counts towards your hours. If you have to travel for your job, time spent traveling counts your overtime hours – but your commuting hours to/from work do not. However, if you have to travel between job sites, to meet a client, or make a delivery, these hours all count towards overtime.

If you have any questions, please contact us.